Category Archives: collecting

Artist Seth Haverkamp

In August 2009 I posted about artist Seth Haverkamp winning Best of Show at the Portrait Society of America’s Annual Portrait Competition.

I am thrilled to see that Seth is a finalist in the Portrait Society of America’s Annual Portrait Competition for 2014.  This painting is titled Ponderings and it is a gorgeous painting.  If you’re interested in contacting Seth about a commission or just seeing more of his gorgeous work this is a link to his website.

Image

Ponderings, 24×36″, Oil on board

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Artist Seth Haverkamp

Work From Seth Haverkamp's Class

Work From Seth Haverkamp's Class

Several weeks ago I took a one day class with artist Seth Haverkamp at his studio in Northern Virginia.  Seth is a talented student in Robert Liberace’s evening course.   I always look at how quickly he works and am amazed.

In 2008, Seth won the Portrait Society of America’s Best  of Show Award.  He painting of his daughter Echo is brilliant and I think it really reflects the time he spent studying at Studio Incamminati.

Seth had us set up and did a quick demo.  What he asked us to do was a very quick and minimal initial drawing of the model.  By minimal I mean some lines to show the shoulders relative to head and neck and a quick line to place nose, eyes, and mouth. That was it.

His point was that for the class we would be painting the shapes we saw in the models face, instead of taking the time to create a detailed initial drawing, we were to concentrate on matching the color and color temperatures as well as getting the exact shape we saw down on canvas.

Color, bright colors were our friend. This of course immediately made me rather nervous since color application to a grisaille is something I struggle with.  I joked about it in class and Seth did his best to reassure me.

I worked really had during this class to see and accurately paint the colors I saw on the model’s skin.  One of the great things about painting this way is that you have plenty of paint on the panel/linen and it really allows you to manipulate the edges and shapes of the painting.

I really liked the final results of the portrait I painted in this class and used what I learned to play with paint in the final session of Rob’s class.  Robert wasn’t there (they were all in Ireland painting) and I loved the painting that I had worked on for the previous four weeks.  I decided to leave my painting along and to  try Seth’s techniques.

Face Off Results (Pt 2)

Ada

Ada

The Portrait Society of America held a “Face Off competition” during their Art of the Portrait 2009 conference held at the Hyatt in Reston Virginia.  Think 15 artists and 5 models and about 100-200 fellow artists, collectors and students in one large room; if you throw in lights, chairs and organized (but deliciously fun) chaos you have an accurate idea of what being there was like.

Scott Burdick

Scott Burdick

Each model posed for three artists and each section held all of the artists working materials (taborets, palettes, easels and lights) as well as chairs about six-seven feet behind for attendees to watch the artists at work.  The final results can be viewed at the <a title=”Results of the 2009 Face Off Event”

I am linking the pictures I took of the artists at work.  Besides those I’ve already linked of Liberace, Carducci and Ryder; my most favorite ones were the three works by the artists lucky enough to paint Ada.

Paul Newton

Paul Newton

She’s a beautiful model that we occasionally are lucky enough to paint in class.  She has pale translucent skin, dark hair and  very fine delicate features.  She’s also difficult to paint because (at least for me) I tend to lapse into painting what I think I see instead of what is actually there.  Not sure if this makes sense to you…sadly it does to me.

I apologize for the poor quality of the Paul Newton picture, but even though it is fuzzy I think you get the sense of how he was working on the painting;  I think he nailed it.

Scott Burdick

Scott Burdick

Chris Saper

Chris Saper

Paul Newton

Paul Newton

Other pictures of the artists at work.

The Model

Vasudeo Kamath

Vasudeo Kamath

Rich Nelson

Rich Nelson

Thomas Nash

Thomas Nash

The rest of the paintings for the Face Off competition can be found at this link.

Tomorrow the Portrait Society of America begins their 2009 Art of the Portrait Conference in Washington DC.   It should a wonderful event.  Robert Liberace as well as a host of well known and famous artists will be be in attendance and demonstrating, critiquing, meeting collectors and painters and basically having a great time!



Irvine Contemporary Opening

Hello Hope II 2008, by Leslie Holt

Hello Hope II 2008, by Leslie Holt

I browsed through several Art Galleries in the Washington DC 14th Street art corridor today.

Curator’s Office. My first stop was at the Curator’s Office. Andrea Pollan has a small but wonderful gallery and her current show, Potential Energy-A Collaboration, features works on paper by Ann Tarantino and Kate McGraw.

Ann Tarantino has two works which were featured at Jan Beckman’s 20×200 site this week. Both at beautiful, I particularly loved her print Far and Wide but Flying Colors is wonderful as well. Both are still available but moving briskly at the site.

Regime Change Show at Martin Irvine, from Irving Contempary.com

Regime Change Show at Martin Irvine

Jan Beckman’s site sell large, medium, and small editions of the same print in edition sizes of 2, 20, and 200 respectively. The small size limited edition prints are very affordable at $20.00 each.

While I was there, Andrea showed me two new Leslie Holt Hello Kitty paintings, Hello Hope and Hello Change. Both paintings featured different riffs on Shepard Fairey’s famous Obama poster. Both were wonderful but only the Hello Hope was available so I quickly snagged it. Lucky me!

Irvine Contemporary. I ended up at Martin Irvine’s gallery, Irvine Contemporary. There was an amazing show that opened tonight, Regime ChangeStarts at Home features the works of Shepard Fairey (The artist behind the tricolor Obama poster), Al Farrow and and Paul Miller (DJ Spooky).

Rose Girl, by Shepard Fairey, Image from the Irvine Contemporary Website

Rose Girl, by Shepard Fairey, Image from the Irvine Contemporary Website

Shepard Fairey’s work is phenomenal, it is a combination of a collage, stencil and acrylic paints; this is street art at it’s best. Fairey has a strong graphic design background and it really shows in his work. According the his bio at the Martin Irving Gallery Fairey graduated in with a BA 1992 from the Rhode Island School of Design. His work reminds me of some of the intense and graphically powerful socialist party posters I used to see in Germany during the early 1990s. Sadly most of the work was far out of reach for me since it was priced at $16,000-17,000 but the impact of seeing it up close was incredible.

Fairey created a limited edition poster of his larger work, China Girl (original China Girl is shown on the left). the collage background looked like newspapers and the type of thin paper with intricate pattern that reminded me of the delicate wrapping papers available from India. The image is large and powerful.

Rose Girl Limited Edition Print, Irvine Contemporary Gallery

Rose Girl Limited Edition Print, Irvine Contemporary Gallery

The limited edition print (450 total) lacks some of the depth of the original. Understandable because there is no collage involved; it’s a sexy image anyway. Although I love the original the print was very inexpensive at $100 each. The graphic image was amazing and yes I did buy one; how could I not?

The alley behind the gallery featured numerous posters that had been pasted to a wall. As a cohesive whole they were amazing. Beside thin posters featuring images by Fairey, there was also some of the paper he’d used in his collage works. Many of the posters were blocked together and there were also a few unique ones. Gallery guests were welcome to photograph them.

Obey Poster Wall (segment/fragment)

Obey Poster Wall (segment/fragment)

I spied a large Obama poster of Fairey’s which had been pasted on the third story wall of a building near Whole Foods. There were also several freshly pasted posters plastered up on different surfaces throughout the 14th Street corridor.

Overall it was an amazing show. The first time I’d seen Fairey’s work was the Obama poster (which I love). I was lucky enough to have a friend give me the Obama poster when they returned from the Democratic Convention in Denver.

If you live in the DC area make sure you stop by the Martin Irving Gallery to this show; it’s amazing. They are located at 1412 14th Street NW, Washington DC 202-332-8767.

Note- there are several great blog posts about this show and Shepard Fairey as well.  checkout Adventrues of Hoogrrl.

Studio Escalier and Michelle Tully

Cages d'Amour (Physalis peruviana) by Michelle Tully

Cages d'Amour (Physalis peruviana) by Michelle Tully

When I first started learning to paint with oils I spent a great deal of time searching art magazines and books as well as the Internet.  I had only a few questions in mind; how did I wish to paint, whose work did I find and then love,  and more specifically what did I wish to paint (e.g., figure, still life)?

Since I was new to oil painting and only had a watercolor background everything was new and I felt I  could explore without any preconceived notions getting in the way.

Flying Apple by Michelle Tully

Flying Apple by Michelle Tully

I first stumbled upon artist Duane Keiser’s blog I noticed a link his blogroll for a blog called  The Silver Fortress.  When  I clicked through the site, I read that The Silver Fortress was a blog for an art school in Argenton-Chateau, France.

According to their site they were a “a contemporary classical art colony” in Argenton-Chateau, France.  I wasn’t sure exactly what an art colony was but it sounded interesting so I started exploring the site further.

The creators of the Silver Fortress Blog, are Timothy Stotz and Nichole Michelle Tully, they  run a contemporary classical art school called Studio Escalier in Argenton-Chateau, France.

Emily by Michelle Tully

Emily by Michelle Tully

The Silver Fortress was a blog established to sell small daily paintings created by the faculty at Studio Escalier and the proceeds were used to fund a scholarship fund.

The school’s faculty is impressive:  Timothy Stotz, Nichole Michelle Tully, Anthony Ryder and Ted Seth Jacobs. According to the site, Tully and Stotz  were two of  original eight members of the Jacob Collins Studio and founding members of the Water Street Atelier in Brooklyn NY. In an intereting aside, I believe Timothy Stotz and Duane Keiser both attended Randolph Macon College in Richmond, VA.

Onions by Anthony Ryder

Onions by Anthony Ryder

Artist Tony Ryder is renown for his draughtsman skills  as well as his sensitivity when painting the human figure.  He heads his own studio and academy in Santa Fe New Mexico.

Anthony Ryder is the author or the book, The Artist’s Complete Guide to Figure Drawing: A Contemporary Perspective on the Classical Tradition.   Both Timothy Stotz and Anthony Ryder studied with Ted Seth Jacobs at the Arts Student League in New York City, NY.

Above St Johns by Michelle Tully

Above St Johns by Michelle Tully

According to the Studio Escalier site, Ted Seth Jacobs has taught art at the New York Arts Student League, The New York Academy of Art and he is the founder of the Ecole Albert Defois in France. Ted Seth Jacobs conducts workshops within the states as well as overseas.

Ted Seth Jacobs is “esteemed for his strong influence on three generations of artist-draftsman, and artist-teachers in NYC, including Andrew Reiss, Jerry Weiss, Anthony Ryder, Randolph Melick, Will Cotton, Jacob Collins and Michael Grimaldi among others.”

The Ortiz and Sandia by Michelle Tully

The Ortiz and Sandia by Michelle Tully

Studio Escalier offers several courses, an intensive 3-month program, a 9-week course of study, or a  one-month course of study in either the facilities in Argenton-Chateau or it’s newest offering of Paris.

Although I subscribe to the Silver Fortress feed and I am not certain when they actually ceased their scholarship fund raising efforts through the blog and eBay.  Currently I receive posts of studies that are in process by the faculty.  It’s extremely instructive by I miss the opportunity to view Michelle’s wonderful 4″x4″ gems.

Note, I forgot to mention that I actually own all of these paintings (except the poster study).  I used to keep both of the New Mexico landscapes next to my bed to remind me of New Mexico when I was homesick.

Sarah Poster Study

Sarah Poster Study

I should probably also mention that if you are an artist who is interested in classical realism, you should seriously look into attending a session, whether one month or more, at Studio Escalier.  If you go through the Silver Fortress blog you will get an excellent sense of the techniques and methods that Timothy and Michelle.  Usually they begin with a pencil study and then progress to a ‘poster’ study.

When I first started reading about Timothy, Michelle and Anthony Ryder’s techniques I didn’t understand the term.  Basically its a way of rendering your subject looking only at broad strokes of paint, trying to work out composition and color harmony issues.

I spent forever trying to buy a portait study.  I wanted one to be able to see their layered approach to painting, (charcoal, thin thin diluted wash over charcoal, thing diluted layer with color and the final glorious layer.

Update

It looks like Michelle Tully and Tim Stotz are back up and posting paintings on ebay again-horray!

Robert Liberace Collection (part 2)

 

Untitled Female Torso Study by Robert Liberace

Untitled Female Torso Study by Robert Liberace

Artist  Robert Liberace teaches classes on Fridays at the Art League in Alexandria Virgina.  He teaches drawing in the morning, oil painting in the afternoon and either a drawing or a painting class in the evening; it switches back and forth each term.

I love that he teaches an evening class because it provides those with traditional day jobs the opportunity to study with Rob.  Additionally, if you are focusing on a specific skill, say you’re working on your figure painting, he will usually accommodate you and your focus. 

All of the work I own by Robert are studies or demonstrations from his class.  I love the raw energy and the fresh feeling of these works.  They are not or finished; they are quick and convey as important information as possible (shadows temperature, flesh tones, what the reflected light is doing to the skin and the shadows etc).
 
The Female Torso Study  was created within about an hours during class.  Rob spent time explaining what he was doing as well as the choices he was making (i.e., what to emphasis, what to edit)  as he drew the model.  If you click on the picture you should be able to see the picture larger and really get a sense of how delicately the drawing was done.
 

Untitled female head study by Robert Liberace

Untitled female head study by Robert Liberace

Another wonderful drawing I own by Rob is a Untitled Female Head Study done using pencil and chalk.  One of things that might be easy to overlook on the Female Head Study is the egg floating above the model.  Rob will often start both his drawing and painting demonstrations by drawing (or painting) an egg.  Rob uses the eggs to demonstrate how simply we can render the light and shadows as well as the reflected light and cast shadows.

Quite often the eggs are wonderful jewels in their own right, but I find them very instructive sitting next to the figure or portrait.  They allow me to see clearly where the lights/shadows are without getting lost in the details of where to place the model’s features.

 

 

Untitled Silver Point Drawing by Robert Liberace

Untitled Silver Point Drawing by Robert Liberace

 This last drawing is one of my favorites.  The model is one that Rob has used for a number of his drawings.  To really see the range of this model’s abilities I recommend you view Robert’s page at the Arcadia Gallery website.

I have to apologize in advance for the quality of this photo.  It is difficult to photograph silver point because the metal tends to reflect light and throw it back at the camera lens.

If you have never heard of silver point, recommend you take look at this  silver point website, it is a great source of information, forums and resources for those interested this medium.

The basic technique for silver point (or any metal point since you can use gold wire or platinum wire as well)  is to draw using a piece of silver wire on a prepared ground.  It can be time consuming and it takes some skill because once a mark is down on the paper it is there forever.  The silver tarnishes over time, so a well executed silver point drawing will only get lovelier over time.

I have several more drawings, one wonderful ink portrait (a friend gave that to me for a housewarming gift!) as well as a phenomenal leg study.  I will try to get them photographed and posted soon.